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THE CUBICLE NEXT DOOR by Siri Mitchell

The Cubicle Next Door by Siri Mitchell

From the Back Cover:

What if God has more planned for your life than you do?


Jackie Harrison is a civilian who loves her job at the U.S. Air Force Academy. That is, until she is forced to divide her office into cubicles and share the space with a new history instructor, Lt. Col. Joseph Gallagher. A charmer in a flight suit, Joe wants to explore both Colorado and a growing relationship with his new cubicle mate. The office was bad enough, but Jackie’s beside herself when Joe shows up in her home and church, even turning her grandmother’s weekly bridge game into poker night!

Jackie goes online to vent, but she eventually finds herself admitting her conflicted feelings about this office neighbor who drives her crazy and makes her heart flutter. But when her blog—The Cubicle Next Door—is featured on TV, everyone begins to read it, including Joe. Will he figure out the anonymous confessions and frustrations are written about him? And how will Jackie ever express her heart offline?

***

This tale of limited work space, hidden identity, and cyber confessions is for anyone who has ever longed to be themselves and to find a life beyond cubicle walls.

Camy here:

This is a light, fun tale that gives an inside peek into the Air Force Academy.

The heroine is funny and neurotic on the inside, while presenting a straight-man façade on the outside that makes for entertaining reading. The backstory about her mother and grandmother is interesting, and it will resonate with any reader who has lost one or both parents, or felt abandoned.

The hero is both breezy and sexy. At points, I thought he was a little too perfect, a little too persistent--but his character matched the heroine quite well.

I also didn't quite buy the whole blog thing, but it's a very cute and quirky story device, and an interesting way to help the storyline unfold.

Readers who love Steeple Hill and Heartsong Presents will enjoy this romantic chick-lit.

Comments

  1. The too-perfect guy doesn't work for me either but I still love Siri's work! She was great to interview :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. And one reader who thinks Steeple Hill and Heartsong Presents are often formulaic, sappy, and awkward (though there are several excellent and quite a few good authors in there too) also loved this book. Mix Kristin Billerbeck with Susan May Warren and you're getting warm - but Siri has her own unique flair. Equating this novel with cookie-cutter book club tales seems a bit unfair.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Camy, thanks for hosting me!

    Many blessings, Siri

    ReplyDelete

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